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The StageAgent Theatre Blog

News, thoughts, opinions and advice for the performing arts community.

Actors and Costume Designers: Building a Perfect Relationship

Designer

Whether you’ve been cast in a college production of The Pirates of Penzance,  a community theatre production of Steel Magnolias, or the Broadway national tour of Kinky Boots, you—the actor—are only one of many people creating the character you will portray onstage. A key figure in the development of a character is the costume designer, and the relationship between actor and costume designer is the most intimate in our industry. Designers see actors in their most vulnerable state, exposing the insecurities of body and image.

Clothing is the most intimate and relatable design element. Everyone wears clothing, and everyone has opinions about clothing. Often what we wear says more than any words or actions do. Who we are. Where we’re from. What year it is. How much money we have. How much money we want other to think we have. These are just a few stories clothing tells in real life and onstage, making the relationship between the actor and the costumer one of the most important.

Only by working together can these two artists craft a character.

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New Editor Joins StageAgent

Photo credit: BoB Knapp.

“Welcome to StageAgent!” A few weeks ago, that was the subject of a very anticipated email.

Hi. I’m Laura Ware, the new editor for StageAgent, and I couldn’t be more thrilled. Let me share a little about myself.

I’m a performer and acting teacher living in Astoria, Queens, New York, a quick subway ride away from Times Square and Broadway!

I’m originally from the Los Angeles area in Southern California, so I swapped one coast for the other and I love both. I attended the University of California, Santa Barbara, where I received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Acting and following that I got my Master of Fine Arts in Musical Theater from San Diego State University. I spent many years working around California on the Civic Light Opera circuit, working my way up from the ensemble in shows like Carousel to supporting roles in Oliver! and 42nd Street to leads in Annie, Me and My Girl, and Nunsense.

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For the Love of Blood: Your Ultimate Guide to Stage Blood

With the Ides of March upon us — the day upon which Julius Caesar was murdered — it’s the perfect time of year to talk stage blood. The key to perfect stage blood is choosing the right variety for you particular blood scenario. Whether it’s buckets of blood in Martin McDonagh’s Lieutenant of Inishmore, or Lady Macbeth’s bloody hands in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, stage blood is an exhilarating, thrilling, sticky mess. Here are some tips for making the most out of even the stickiest stage blood situations.

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Surviving Tax Season as an Artist

Time For Taxes Message Showing Taxation Due

When you work as an artist, tax season blows. With a slough of 1099s and income that is often earned from various states, artist taxes are some of the most complex. Meanwhile, we earn gross incomes small enough that we often can’t afford accountants. Instead, artists are left to struggle through seas of forms, cross our fingers that we’ll avoid an audit, and hope against hope that we can eek out a refund. Before panic sets in, take a moment to relish in the fact that YOU MADE A LIVING AS AN ARTIST. Now, get smart, submit your paperwork, and get that refund!

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The Hearts of Monsters: Why We Need to Play Villains

Scott Ward Abernethy in The Magic Tree at Keegan Theatre in Washington DC.  Photo by C. Stanley Photography.

“You are terrifying!” came the enthusiastic greeting as I stepped into the post show lobby. . I had grown used to it by then, and knew from the grins on the faces of this pleasant older couple that it meant they’d enjoyed the show. I smiled back sheepishly and offered a genuine, though bashful thank you, trying to distance myself somewhat from the character I had just played. Each night, I even made a point of dressing up more than usual when I went to the theatre. This was my first production in a new city, after all, and I wanted to be sure that everyone knew I wasn’t really a sociopath.

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